Interview with an Author: Timothy Weatherall’s Publishing Journey

Timothy Weatherall

Timothy Weatherall

I had the pleasure of meeting Timothy Weatherall in November 2015 at the Wasaga Beach Public Library, where we were given the opportunity to talk about our books. Tim’s life experience, and his publishing journey, are completely different from my own, which is exactly why I invited him to guest on my blog.

Judy: At the library, you spoke about growing up in the Collingwood, Ontario, area, and how your school experience moulded you as a writer. Can you share that with my readers?

Tim:  During my K-8 school years I was living near Stayner on our family farm. I believe the combination of hard work, long bus rides, and lack of other children in the area were the major contributors to the development of my imagination. In school I had a few things that came really easy, such as math where I won a few competitions. Spelling, grammar, and punctuation were real struggle points (not good for a writer). I was, to my knowledge, the only person in both the enrichment program for the gifted (mine was a very small gift), and the remedial program for children with learning difficulties. These experiences made me appreciate all people, and their struggles.

Cover full resolutionJudy: Tell me a bit about your first novel, The Incarnations of Joe – Book 1 The Key.

Tim: The Incarnations of Joe follows a seventeen-year-old boy (Joe) over a three-month period beginning on Christmas day 1960. Joe was brought as an infant to the deep north by his mother who had become the sole heir to a remote gold mine. What is revealed are secrets about Joe’s true heritage, his blood father, and an ability that he himself is unaware he possesses. The lines between who are the heroes, villains, and victims are often clouded, as Joe is tormented by both the evil in the darkness, and the evil in the light who both seek to control him, and his hidden abilities.

Judy: You’re visiting today to talk about finding the right way to publish. Tell us about your process, and how you came to Friesen Publishing for your novel.

Tim: The first thing you need to understand is why you want to be published? If it’s just to have a book in hand to share and be proud of then I 100% say self-publishing is for you. If you want fame and fortune (or at least a steady income) things get more complicated.

People with all of the skills, including writing, editing, formatting, and marketing (as well as capital for expenses) should consider self-publishing: you keep the control over your work, and the majority of revenue. Traditional publishing can reduce some of your startup costs, but don’t have any illusions that if you write it, they will sell it. Sometimes going traditional will save a few dollars, but what you give up in ownership and earnings is what ultimately led me to work with FriesenPress, who I consider to bring the best of both worlds.

Judy: Describe your writing process and/or a typical day in your life.

Tim: I find writing in the morning to be most productive. When I read, or when I write, I like absolute silence. I also like to have my ideas before I sit down. Much of what I write comes to me when I drive, or when I’m at work. When you try to force it. things come out weak.

Judy: What’s the best writing advice you have ever read or been given?

Tim: The best advice is write every day. I’ve heard that same advice time and time again and my own experience confirms it. Your work will have a better flow the more you keep to this rule.

Judy: Do you have a favorite book of all time?

Tim: Watership Down by Richard Adams. If not for this book I might not have ever believed I could enjoy reading after being bored by other “timeless classics.”

Judy: Can you recommend a lesser-known author well worth reading?

Tim: L.K. Elliott is a Canadian author out of Alberta is an incredible talent. Her work is classified under the self-help genre. L.K’s writing style and personal experiences in life leave you feeling better about the world, and yourself.

Tim's book made the cover of the 2015 FriesenPress catalogue, and no wonder. The cover is spectacular.

Tim’s book made the cover of the 2015 FriesenPress catalogue, and no wonder. The cover, by Geoff, Designer at FriesenPress, is spectacular!

Judy: What’s next for Timothy Weatherall?

Tim: The Incarnations of Joe is intended to be a three book series. I’m currently about halfway through the first draft of book two “The Gate.”  All three books have a rough plan in place, as do several solo books I’d like to write.

 Thank you, Tim, for sharing your story.

Find Tim on his website and on Twitter,  Facebook, GoodreadsAmazon, and YouTube.

Find The Incarnations of Joe on Amazon. 

Thanks for reading!

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Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 10.24.07 AMEnter to win 1 of 5 eBook copies of  The Hanged Man’s Noose before February 3, 2016. PDF, Kindle/Kobo/iTunes versions available. Winners will be randomly selected by Rafflecopter. Here’s the link: https://t.co/d8oQVDuffm. Good Luck!

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8 responses to “Interview with an Author: Timothy Weatherall’s Publishing Journey

  1. Yes Judy it was definitely meant to be that we met at the library. I think about how close I was to not being able to make that appearance, so thankful I pushed through and got there.

  2. Judy Penz Sheluk

    And all because we met at the Wasaga Beach library :-))

  3. Judy Penz Sheluk

    Yes, Susan, it is, but I like that there are many paths to publication and hope to share more in the future in other author interviews. Thanks so much for stopping by.

  4. Thank your time, comments and wishes. I wish you the best as well.

  5. Thanks very much Judy Penz Sheluk for your time, and your amazing work.

  6. This is very different from both of us, isn’t it, Judy? Nice post.

  7. Judy Penz Sheluk

    Thanks Sheri. It is great to share different publishing paths.

  8. eightpawswriting

    Judy, Thanks for sharing Tim’s path to writing. I agree with Tim, writing everyday helps the ideas and the words flow. Tim, wishing you lots of fun and success with your debut novel.